WORLD WAR ONE CENTENARY

MARCH 1916

TISBURY AND THE GREAT WAR

David Childs

March was quiet on the Western Front but south of Baghdad yet another effort to relieve the besieged garrison in Kut failed. However, the Germans in East Africa were driven off the slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro as the allies gradually took control of that colony. At sea, the Germans extended their submarine campaign at the same time, not coincidentally, declaring war on Portugal.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM

On 11 March 1916, twenty three year old Chief Petty Officer Frederick William Davis was reported dead. He was serving in the Submarine E 5 which failed to return from patrol and was believed to have been sunk by the German warship Strassburg on 7th March.

On 20th March Private Thomas Martin Burt serving with the Royal Fusiliers was killed in action and was buried at Lievin in the Pas de Calais. He was just twenty one years old and the son of Frederick and Elizabeth Burt of Bridzor farm, Wardour.

POEMS FOR MARCH

The German expressionist writer August Stramm, born in 1874, was killed in Belorus in 1915. Recognised now as a leader of the avant-garde, he reflected the explosive destructiveness of war in his poems written home to his wife in which the very words and sentences are torn apart, sometimes reformed, sometimes as meaningless as the horror he was witnessing.

Melancholy

Living desires
Shouldering to stand
Glimpses searching
Dying grows
Striding to strive
What is to come
SHRIEKS!
Deep
Dumbing
We.

Wound

Earth under the helmet flowers
Falling stars
Grope through space.
Roaring shudders
Whirl
Alienation.
Distance
Mist
Weeping
Your glance.

Battlefield

Yielding clod lulls iron off to sleep
bloods clot the patches where they oozed
rusts crumble
fleshes slime
sucking lusts around decay.
Murder on murder blinks
in childish eyes.

Wargrave

Sticks plead cross arms
Writing zagt pale unknown
Flowers impudent
Dust shyly.
Flare
Water
Glast
Forgotten.


©  Tisbury History Society
free hit counter javascript